Thesis of music

One cannot consider the issue of corporate worship without first considering the question of why people worship at all.  It would seem, in the words of Marva Dawn’s book, to be A Royal Waste of Time.   Yet, the general existence of worship rituals in all known cultures testifies to the importance of worship to Mankind.  Evelyn Underhill states that worship, in its simplest form, is “an acknowledgment of Transcendence; that is to say, of a Reality independent of the worshipper, which is always more or less deeply coloured by mystery, and which is there first.”   The acknowledgement of this mysterious and independent reality has revealed itself in countless customs and rituals.  Ronald Byars suggests that this natural craving for ritual is actually instinctive in humans.
No examination of a culture is complete apart from a study of that culture’s ritual patterns and ceremonies.  Since Man is both spirit and flesh, there seems to be an innate drive to enflesh worship through the use of signs, symbols and ceremonies.  The employment of these elements has by nature a social quality, thereby creating ritual, which Underhill defines as “an agreed pattern of ceremonial movement, sound or verbal formula, creating a framework in which corporate religious action can take place.”
Hebrew ritual, in particular, is well documented, with the lyrics to their music still preserved , giving a living glimpse into some of the various motivations and methods of their worship.  In the Psalms we see processionals, liturgical responses, songs and prayers.  The rituals of a particular people seem to reveal what they believe about their gods, and what their responsibilities are in light of that belief.  Because Christianity is the fulfillment of the Jewish anticipation of a Messiah, Hebrew worship provides a natural foundation for the consideration of the essentials of Christian worship.  As background for this study, I will briefly review four motivations for Jewish worship: covenant obligation; appropriate response; obedience to the command to praise; and, finally, the purpose of human existence.

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Slap bass executions on the backbeat are found in styles of country western music of the 1930s, and the late '40s early '50s music of Hank Williams reflected a return to strong backbeat accentuation as part of the honky tonk style of country. [17] In the mid-1940s " hillbilly " musicians the Delmore Brothers were turning out boogie tunes with a hard driving back beat, such as the No. 2 hit "Freight Train Boogie" in 1946, as well as in other boogie songs they recorded. [ citation needed ] Similarly Fred Maddox 's characteristic backbeat, a slapping bass style, helped drive a rhythm that came to be known as rockabilly , one of the early forms of rock and roll . [18] Maddox had used this style as early as 1937. [19]

Part of the answer may involve a return to ideology. The material realities of trade networks, commodity markets, and labor struggles can at times prove largely out of step with how everyday people perceived these forces through thick ideological lenses.  Politics can zig while economics zag. Understanding how people thought about slavery and capitalism might ultimately be just as important as how these systems functioned empirically.  Perhaps a study similar in form to Amy Dru Stanley’s From Bondage to Contract (1998) might help bridge the gap between intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history while insisting on the centrality of emancipation as a transformative event in American life.  Thinking about capitalism as a worldview and political ideology as Holt and others have done in different contexts may also help answer the Civil War and emancipation questions.  A system that was profitable, expanding, and in accord with its Northern business associates might still have seen itself as otherwise while being seen as something different once the complex dance of electoral politics, popular culture, and finicky ideologies start to move.

Thesis of music

thesis of music

Part of the answer may involve a return to ideology. The material realities of trade networks, commodity markets, and labor struggles can at times prove largely out of step with how everyday people perceived these forces through thick ideological lenses.  Politics can zig while economics zag. Understanding how people thought about slavery and capitalism might ultimately be just as important as how these systems functioned empirically.  Perhaps a study similar in form to Amy Dru Stanley’s From Bondage to Contract (1998) might help bridge the gap between intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history while insisting on the centrality of emancipation as a transformative event in American life.  Thinking about capitalism as a worldview and political ideology as Holt and others have done in different contexts may also help answer the Civil War and emancipation questions.  A system that was profitable, expanding, and in accord with its Northern business associates might still have seen itself as otherwise while being seen as something different once the complex dance of electoral politics, popular culture, and finicky ideologies start to move.

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