Essays on josquin desprez

Fétis believed that tonality, tonalité moderne , was entirely cultural, saying, "For the elements of music, nature provides nothing but a multitude of tones differing in pitch, duration, and intensity by the greater or least degree ... The conception of the relationships that exist among them is awakened in the intellect, and, by the action of sensitivity on the one hand, and will on the other, the mind coordinates the tones into different series, each of which corresponds to a particular class of emotions, sentiments, and ideas. Hence these series become various types of tonalities."( Fétis 1844 , 11–12) "But one will say, 'What is the principle behind these scales, and what, if not acoustic phenomena and the laws of mathematics, has set the order of their tones?' I respond that this principle is purely metaphysical [anthropological]. We conceive this order and the melodic and harmonic phenomena that spring from it out of our conformation and education."( Fétis 1844 , 249)

And then there is G. K. Chesterton: This brilliant, and brilliantly entertaining, writer was called “the master without a masterpiece” for the uniformly superb quality of his columns, essay, biographies, books on society and religion, poetry, short stories and novels. His novels, such as The Man Who Was Thursday and The Ball and the Cross are typically bizarre, rollicking, and even surreal—but always in ways that highlight the deeper vision of man that his protagonists strive to embrace and defend. In this case, we have a brand new edition of Chesterton’s 1914 novel The Flying Inn (Ignatius, 295 pages). It tells the story of a small group of rebels who have one goal: To thwart the British government’s attempt to impose prohibition on England!

Essays on josquin desprez

essays on josquin desprez

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essays on josquin desprez